AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center
At The University of Texas at Austin
1900 University Ave • Austin, TX 78705

 

VIP Reception 6:00pm
General Registration & Reception 6:30pm
Dinner 7:00pm

James C. Harrington Social Justice Award Honoree and Keynote Speaker:

 

Pamela S. Karlan

 

 Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School.

Pamela S. Karlan is the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School.

Karlan’s primary scholarly interests concern constitutional litigation and the law of democracy. She is the co-author of several leading casebooks, a monograph on constitutional interpretation, and dozens of scholarly articles. Karlan received her bachelor’s, master’s, and law degrees from Yale. After clerking for Judge Abraham D. Sofaer (Southern District of New York) and Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the U.S. Supreme Court, she served as an assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund doing voting rights and employment discrimination litigation. During 2014 and 2015, she served as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice. At DOJ, she received the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service – the department’s highest award for employee performance – as part of the team responsible for implementing the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor. She also received the John Marshall Award for Providing Legal Advice – the department’s highest award to attorneys for excellence in specialized areas – as part of the team responsible for guiding the department to its new position regarding Title VII and gender identity. Early in her career, she was named one of the American Lawyer Public Sector 45 B a group of lawyers “actively using their law degrees to change lives.” More recently, she was included on the Politico 50 – a group of “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.”

Karlan has worked on over 100 merits cases at the U.S. Supreme Court, a number involving Texas, including: Fisher v. University of Texas, finding constitutional the University of Texas’s use of race in its admissions process (a form of affirmative action) constitutional; Perry v. Perez, challenging Texas’ 2011 electoral redistricting under the Voting Rights Act; and Lawrence v. Texas, striking down a Texas law criminalizing certain sexual conduct between two persons of the same sex.

Karlan has received numerous teaching awards. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the American Law Institute.

Pamela S. Karlan is the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School.

Karlan’s primary scholarly interests concern constitutional litigation and the law of democracy. She is the co-author of several leading casebooks, a monograph on constitutional interpretation, and dozens of scholarly articles. Karlan received her bachelor’s, master’s, and law degrees from Yale. After clerking for Judge Abraham D. Sofaer (Southern District of New York) and Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the U.S. Supreme Court, she served as an assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund doing voting rights and employment discrimination litigation. During 2014 and 2015, she served as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice. At DOJ, she received the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service – the department’s highest award for employee performance – as part of the team responsible for implementing the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor. She also received the John Marshall Award for Providing Legal Advice – the department’s highest award to attorneys for excellence in specialized areas – as part of the team responsible for guiding the department to its new position regarding Title VII and gender identity. Early in her career, she was named one of the American Lawyer Public Sector 45 B a group of lawyers “actively using their law degrees to change lives.” More recently, she was included on the Politico 50 – a group of “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.”

Karlan has worked on over 100 merits cases at the U.S. Supreme Court, a number involving Texas, including: Fisher v. University of Texas, finding constitutional the University of Texas’s use of race in its admissions process (a form of affirmative action) constitutional; Perry v. Perez, challenging Texas’ 2011 electoral redistricting under the Voting Rights Act; and Lawrence v. Texas, striking down a Texas law criminalizing certain sexual conduct between two persons of the same sex.

Karlan has received numerous teaching awards. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the American Law Institute.

 

Renato Ramírez Community Empowerment Awardee:

 

Mark Strama

 

For his commitment to voting rights and his work to empower poor communities by expanding access to the internet.

Mark is the head of Google Fiber in Austin. Previously, he represented the north Austin area in the Texas House of Representatives. Mark received Honorable Mentions on Texas Monthly’s Ten Best Legislators list in three of his five sessions in the House. Texas Monthly said “Strama cares as much about others’ success as his own.” Prior to running for public office, Mark founded the first company to enable Americans to fill out a voter registration form on the Internet 700,000 people used this technology to register to vote in the 2000 election cycle. Earlier, Mark was Director of Programs at Rock the Vote, a nonpartisan organization that works with MTV and the music industry to engage young people in the political process. He previously worked for former Texas Governor Ann Richards and Texas State Senator Rodney Ellis. Mark graduated from Brown University with degrees in philosophy and political science. He is married to Crystal Cotti; they have three young daughters, who fervently, desperately, want a dog.

 

TCRP Rising Leader
Awardee:

 

Greg Casar

 

For his dedication to fighting for civil rights and economic opportunity for Austin’s marginalized communities.

Gregorio “Greg” Casar is a native Texan, the son of Mexican immigrants, and an Austin City Council Member representing District 4 for his second term. Greg’s priorities include social equity, shared prosperity, affordability, environmental
stewardship, and public safety for all.

Since taking office, Council Member Casar has worked to ensure North Austin families have a seat at the table when it comes to decision-making at City Hall. In his first term Casar helped organize the first two tenants associations at mobile home parks in Austin—both located in District 4—which unified against unlawful and unfair actions in their community including evictions.

Council Member Casar has championed civil rights and economic opportunity. He authored the initiative making Austin the first Fair Chance Hiring city in the South. These new rules provide an opportunity for Austinites to be judged based on their potential rather than solely on their conviction history. Casar sponsored and passed over a dozen major housing initiatives aimed at keeping working-class and middle-class people in Austin. These initiatives dedicated unprecedented amounts of city budget dollars to affordable housing construction and rehabilitation programs, and made changes in Austin’s urban planning to combat economic segregation in housing.

Council Member Casar has advocated for a comprehensive community policing program for North Austin and better staffing for emergency services workers. He worked to bring several new or improved park spaces to District 4, which has the least amount of park space out of all City Council districts. Casar initiated policies to raise the minimum wage for both city employees and private-sector workers on city contracts. He also fought to ensure North Austin’s transportation issues are a priority for all of City Hall by dedicating funding to fix Austin’s most dangerous intersections—many of those in District 4—and worked with constituents to bring needed sidewalks and crosswalks to neighborhood schools.

A graduate of the University of Virginia, Greg previously served as the Policy Director for Workers Defense Project, where he spearheaded campaigns that won major policy reforms to improve wages, education, and workplace safety across Austin, garnering national attention. First elected in 2014, Greg is the youngest City Council Member in Austin’s history and serves as District 4’s first-ever direct representative. Greg’s efforts were recognized by Austin Chronicle readers, who voted him as the 2015 “Best Elected City Official.”

Thank you to our Bill of Rights Dinner Co-Chairs, Alan Schoenbaum and Melissa Fruge

A powerful gathering

 

What does fighting for civil rights in Texas look like?

 

Through speakers, conversation, and networking with other civil rights activists and advocates, we hope you’ll learn more about civil rights work and connect with community members that you can partner with in the future.

#BOR2017

 

Hosted by the Texas Civil Rights Project, one of the most influential civil rights organizations in the Lone Star State.

The Location

AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center
At the University of Texas at Austin

 

1900 University Avenue Austin, Texas 78705

 

(map)

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